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By Tim Moody

I saw him as I pumped gas in my car at the Shell Station. It was hot outside and he was sitting in the shade in front of the convenience store. An older man, thin, African American, with a scruffy two or three-day growth of white stubble and shaggy salt and pepper hair. As I walked into the convenience store to get a soft drink he smiled at me with uneven teeth. There was a warmth in his smile. He didn’t ask for anything. But I knew he was there to accept any change anyone might give him.

I returned to my air-conditioned car and stared at him for a minute. As I drove out I went around to where he was and rolled down my window. I motioned for him to come over. He slowly got up and walked to my car. “Yes sir?” he said. I handed him some cash and said, “What is your name, friend?“ He said, “Carl.” I said, “You have a good day, Carl.” He smiled and put his hands together and bowed and said, “Oh, God bless you, sir. God bless you.”

I don’t know his situation. But whatever it is I felt an urge to connect with him in some small way. I wanted to know his name. A name carries our identity. It’s the

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Parenting in the Age of Technology and Bullies

Kristen Cannata
Kristen Cannata

I sit down with Kristen Cannata, a mother of two young boys, to discuss how she navigates the world of parenting in the age of technology and bullies. She talks about the need for children to appreciate that the interactions they have with people, animals, and the natural world are always more satisfying and important than an iPhone, TV, computer, or iPad.  And how essential it is for children to learn how to treat others as they want to be treated.

  • Part of loving children is showing them how to behave so they treat themselves and others with respect and kindness.
  • Children need to know life is not perfect and that there will be situations where they have to deal with challenges such as bullies.
  • Parents must take care of themselves so they can be fully there for their children.

 

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RYS 137: Love Listens to Understand

Have you ever seen a UFO? Or been visited by little gray, not green, aliens?  I have. Which taught me there are millions of us with millions of different experiences. We cannot all have the same experiences. That’s why it’s so important we listen to one another to understand rather than simply dismiss each other because we have not personally experienced the same.

  • You can imagine how surreal and strange it must be to grow up with a secret you are not able to share with anyone for fear of being labeled crazy.
  • Finding others who share the same experience is comforting because you can’t be crazy when someone, anyone, steps up and says, “Hey, that also happened to me.”
  • Each experience you and I have in life is a unique opportunity to grow our sympathy, empathy, and compassion for others.

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Our most important asset: time.

Time-more-valuable-than-gold

The realization of how sacred a resource time is came to me on a rainy afternoon in a movie theater. The newly released film was horrible. The plot was thin, and the animated characters from a popular cartoon were now silly as “real” people.

Even so, I was torn about leaving. It was raining outside, and there was not much else to do on the gray Saturday afternoon. Plus I’d paid for the ticket and still had some popcorn.

After a few more minutes of wavering back and forth, I decided I’d had enough. Other people may have found it worthy of 114 minutes of their life, but I did not. I walked out less than fifteen minutes into it. Making the Read more

RYS 136: Let’s Take the Perfection Pressure Off

In this Episode:

Practice Makes us Proficient! Which Takes the Perfection Pressure Off.

Do you like lasagna? I do, very much. Honestly and with all modesty I can say my lasagna is to die for. I don’t mean my lasagna will literally kill you. Heavens NO! The expression “it’s to die for” means something is fantastic, incredible, magnificent, and in the case of food over the top delicious. And my lasagna should be first-rate, an award-winning stack of deliciousness because I’ve spent the past 45 years mastering the recipe.

  • We don’t get good at anything – cooking, relationships, a job, patience – without practice.
  • If we want to be really good at something we must get really good at practicing that something.
  • Practice will make us proficient, not perfect. Takes a lot of stress off, doesn’t it?

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Hollywood’s Idea of Women is Changing, Slowly

Nicole Stanton
Nicole Stanton

I sit down with Nicole Stanton, actress, and producer, to discuss how she navigates the male-dominated world of Hollywood where using sex to sell still seems to be the lowest common denominator. She talks about how the industry is changing its views of women, slowly and how consumers can drive change by supporting independent films that feature women. Nicole also offers advice for women who are navigating the confusing world of dating.

  • As a society, we must broaden our view of one another and accept we don’t have to fit into a certain box.
  • Social media offers wonderful access to people but also allows us to hide or to create a false sense of intimacy.
  • To successfully negotiate the dating world it is vital to know what you want and need and to value integrity as the common bond that holds a relationship together.

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The way to honor suicide.

cliff

By Tim Moody

The distinguished French philosopher and priest, Teilhard de Chardin, wrote, “Humankind is being brought to a moment where it will have to decide between suicide and adoration.”

The distance between those two is enormous. It’s a long drop from adoration to suicide but according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 45,000 Americans killed themselves in 2016, the most recent statistics available. Another 1 million people attempt suicide each year.

The latest casualty was celebrated chef, author, and world traveler Anthony Bourdain. He left us at age 61, devoted to a beautiful girlfriend and the father of an adorable 11-year old daughter. Famous, wealthy, revered by millions of fans, Bourdain nevertheless found life unbearable.

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We all feel.

Girl and Father for FB

When I was eleven years old I was hit in the head with a baseball bat. It was an accident and my fault. I was playing baseball with a few kids from the neighborhood in the backyard of our home on Locust Street in Victoria, Texas. I was catching. I did not think my playmate would swing at the badly pitched ball and I moved forward. She did swing and hit me with full force on my left temple.

The blow to my head hurt so bad I cried and cried.  My skull pounded for hours and my vision was blurry. I was sick to my stomach and thought I would faint. Although I was not taken to the doctor, I am certain I suffered a concussion. I know for sure the violent blow permanently injured my neck and jaw as decades later I live in constant discomfort.

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What makes the emptiness bearable is each other.

heart with two hands

By Tim Moody

I keep dipping in and out of the Showtime series, “Billions.” It fascinates me. It depresses me. It wildly entertains me. It intrigues me. It infuriates me. It pushes boundaries that disturb me. It portrays people that I wonder if really exist out there, and if so, man, is society screwed.

The episodes are based on the moral and ethical conflicts between billionaire financier Bobby Axelrod (Damian Lewis) and U.S. Attorney Chuck Rhodes (Paul Giamatti).

Axe, as he is called, is a cunning hedge fund genius with sociopathic

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