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Loving my wife introduced me to my inner woman.

Kameron and Caleb

By Caleb Moody

Yes, loving my wife introduced me to my inner woman, and it’s made me more of a man.

I grew up in Texas during the 80s.  The husband/wife dynamics modeled for me both in my own family and in the culture I grew up in were very traditional.  Men would chat and watch football, women would cook in the kitchen and serve food.  Each member seemed to be in somewhat separate worlds which didn’t often overlap.

As I grew into adolescence and began forming my own ideas about relationships, I remember realizing that I wasn’t looking for someone to wait on me, to wash my laundry, to buy my clothes.  I didn’t want a motherly subordinate, I wanted a strong independent person who would challenge me and walk with me through our life together as an equal partner.

I remember so vividly the day I met my wife. We met at a garage sale.  Along

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Does What We Eat Make Us Sick?

Dawn Wilson
Dawn Wilson

After 20 years of producing and hosting television shows, my guest, Dawn Wilson, has a new passion to help awaken the world to the dangers of herbicides and pesticides sprayed on our food. Dawn shares how saving her mother’s life put her on this new path.  She also brings our attention to the fact there is no requirement to list what herbicides and pesticides are used on food crops. Research points to a dramatic spike in cancer and autism rates since the 1970s when spraying food crops with Glyphosate became the norm.

  • As consumers, we must accept that too often profits are more important to some companies than our health.
  • Eating organic and educating ourselves to the dangers of herbicides and pesticides is vital to maintaining our health and that of our children.
  • It’s important to research and support companies that do acknowledge the dangers of using herbicides and pesticides on our food crops.

Visit Dawn’s website and join her email list. www.glyphosateresiduefree.com

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The gratitude guarantee.

gratitude

There was a time when my focus was on things I did not have. For many years, my glass seemed to be half empty, until I realized I was the one holding the pitcher. I changed my point of view from one of lack to one of gratitude. Through hardship and loss, I began to see life’s glass was actually full to overflowing.

Dealing with physical pain over a long period of time wore me down. After a while, life was dull. I found less joy in daily activities, and the constant discomfort kept me on edge. Every day I woke up focused on the pain. Each evening I went to sleep wishing something would change.

When I received news that my twenty-nine-year-old cousin had been killed in an automobile accident, I experienced a dramatic shift in the way I viewed life. Physical pain turned into a positive sign that I was still alive. It was surprising to discover how much my pain decreased when my focus changed from living in pain to appreciating the life I had.

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Thriving After Great Loss and Cancer

Jean Wall
Jean Wall

My guest for this episode, Jean Wall, discusses something we all know to be true – there is no easy button to life. Jean and her family have gotten hit hard by the challenges and disappointments life presents and yet they have an attitude of gratitude. Two natural disasters, a flood, and a hurricane destroyed their home. Her husband was downsized from his job and the company he devoted 24 years to, refused to give him the pension he’d earned. And Jean recently received a cancer diagnosis.

  • Jean shares there is so much we cannot control that happens to us in life, but we can control our attitude about how we face life’s challenges.
  • Tragedy can bring out the best in us when we choose not to see ourselves as a victim.
  • Family and friends are so important in helping us survive and thrive when life presents tough situations.

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We are here to help each other.

Support

By Tim Moody

I saw him as I pumped gas in my car at the Shell Station. It was hot outside and he was sitting in the shade in front of the convenience store. An older man, thin, African American, with a scruffy two or three-day growth of white stubble and shaggy salt and pepper hair. As I walked into the convenience store to get a soft drink he smiled at me with uneven teeth. There was a warmth in his smile. He didn’t ask for anything. But I knew he was there to accept any change anyone might give him.

I returned to my air-conditioned car and stared at him for a minute. As I drove out I went around to where he was and rolled down my window. I motioned for him to come over. He slowly got up and walked to my car. “Yes sir?” he said. I handed him some cash and said, “What is your name, friend?“ He said, “Carl.” I said, “You have a good day, Carl.” He smiled and put his hands together and bowed and said, “Oh, God bless you, sir. God bless you.”

I don’t know his situation. But whatever it is I felt an urge to connect with him in some small way. I wanted to know his name. A name carries our identity. It’s the

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Parenting in the Age of Technology and Bullies

Kristen Cannata
Kristen Cannata

I sit down with Kristen Cannata, a mother of two young boys, to discuss how she navigates the world of parenting in the age of technology and bullies. She talks about the need for children to appreciate that the interactions they have with people, animals, and the natural world are always more satisfying and important than an iPhone, TV, computer, or iPad.  And how essential it is for children to learn how to treat others as they want to be treated.

  • Part of loving children is showing them how to behave so they treat themselves and others with respect and kindness.
  • Children need to know life is not perfect and that there will be situations where they have to deal with challenges such as bullies.
  • Parents must take care of themselves so they can be fully there for their children.

 

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RYS 137: Love Listens to Understand

Have you ever seen a UFO? Or been visited by little gray, not green, aliens?  I have. Which taught me there are millions of us with millions of different experiences. We cannot all have the same experiences. That’s why it’s so important we listen to one another to understand rather than simply dismiss each other because we have not personally experienced the same.

  • You can imagine how surreal and strange it must be to grow up with a secret you are not able to share with anyone for fear of being labeled crazy.
  • Finding others who share the same experience is comforting because you can’t be crazy when someone, anyone, steps up and says, “Hey, that also happened to me.”
  • Each experience you and I have in life is a unique opportunity to grow our sympathy, empathy, and compassion for others.

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Our most important asset: time.

Time-more-valuable-than-gold

The realization of how sacred a resource time is came to me on a rainy afternoon in a movie theater. The newly released film was horrible. The plot was thin, and the animated characters from a popular cartoon were now silly as “real” people.

Even so, I was torn about leaving. It was raining outside, and there was not much else to do on the gray Saturday afternoon. Plus I’d paid for the ticket and still had some popcorn.

After a few more minutes of wavering back and forth, I decided I’d had enough. Other people may have found it worthy of 114 minutes of their life, but I did not. I walked out less than fifteen minutes into it. Making the Read more

RYS 136: Let’s Take the Perfection Pressure Off

In this Episode:

Practice Makes us Proficient! Which Takes the Perfection Pressure Off.

Do you like lasagna? I do, very much. Honestly and with all modesty I can say my lasagna is to die for. I don’t mean my lasagna will literally kill you. Heavens NO! The expression “it’s to die for” means something is fantastic, incredible, magnificent, and in the case of food over the top delicious. And my lasagna should be first-rate, an award-winning stack of deliciousness because I’ve spent the past 45 years mastering the recipe.

  • We don’t get good at anything – cooking, relationships, a job, patience – without practice.
  • If we want to be really good at something we must get really good at practicing that something.
  • Practice will make us proficient, not perfect. Takes a lot of stress off, doesn’t it?

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Hollywood’s Idea of Women is Changing, Slowly

Nicole Stanton
Nicole Stanton

I sit down with Nicole Stanton, actress, and producer, to discuss how she navigates the male-dominated world of Hollywood where using sex to sell still seems to be the lowest common denominator. She talks about how the industry is changing its views of women, slowly and how consumers can drive change by supporting independent films that feature women. Nicole also offers advice for women who are navigating the confusing world of dating.

  • As a society, we must broaden our view of one another and accept we don’t have to fit into a certain box.
  • Social media offers wonderful access to people but also allows us to hide or to create a false sense of intimacy.
  • To successfully negotiate the dating world it is vital to know what you want and need and to value integrity as the common bond that holds a relationship together.

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